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20121223
20121223
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
that we can make a deal that keeps them from having a nuclear power program. a nuclear energy program. but i wouldn't give up on a deal that keeps them from having a nuclear weapon. that keeps them a certain distance away from having a nuclear weapon. say having some 5% enriched uranium which would still require a substantial and effort taking significant time for them to get a nuclear weapon. now under those circumstances, there have to be enough inspection continued inspection, to provide assurance that that's all that they had. i don't know whether we can reach such an agreement. i don't know what we would have to give. i don't know what else they might have to give in order to reach it. but i think that's worth a real effort to try to achieve. failing that it is possible by an attack, an air attack, to set their program back by a couple of years. on the other hand, that would make relations even more poisonous if that's possible than they are now. and it would certainly rally the iranian population in favor of a nuclear program. a nuclear weapons program. so although i don't rule
to the energy legislation where byrd worked tirelessly on it to get it done without a filibuster. he had the sense that the senate leader should have a special relationship with the president and that is the way the system was supposed to work. of course, the most important in for the senate leader is to make the senate work. byrd knew the senate rules better than any person that ever lived. he lived in dealing with the notion of the fear of a paralyzed senate. he wanted to think that the rules worked, but he knew that in fact jim allen of alabama had cracked the code. he had figured out how to have this filibuster so the senate could be tied up in paralyzed. robert byrd like to think you have to be an expert to do this , but it turned out you do not need to be an expert at all. a couple of senators did not know the rules and they tied the senate up. byrd struggled with the notion of how to keep the unique character of the senate without having a paralyzed? in that regard, he championed rules change. he got some done in 1979. he knew that the senate rules do not work. if they were not fi
believe that human beings have what i call discretionary energy that they can give you or not. and i don't think that they will give it to you if they don't feel that they're treated with dignity and respect every day. i'm treated with dignity and respect. a down payment on that is nobody ever gets hurt here is because we care about our own commitment to our safety, and we care about the people we work with. it swells up to into you do, it gives you a sense of pride with the organization you're involved with. >> then thyou ask them for extr productivity. >> you don't have to ask them. they turn it loose. we went from 1.86 per 100 per year to cause them to miss a work day. we got to 0.13. to give you a reference point, the number in health medical care institutions in the united states is five, right? >> and now described what happened to alcoa commercially, financially under your term. >> well, we -- i think we improved market capitalization of the company 900% while i was there. the market company valued at $4 billion to $28 billion in 13 years. >> and you attribute that to -- the start
:45 and then off to mass every day. he spent an incredible amount of julieanna energy, and i think the fact that he saw every day the gift from god as corny as that sounds interacting with you was as big a deal to him as it was interacting with president kennedy because i think that he saw having been in the war and experienced the depression and really believe in that every person and every interaction was a gift, and i think people get burned out a lot in public service. often times because it is really about them. and i think he didn't get burned out even though he is 95. he was always asking about other people, how you were doing because he was so confident he had a relationship with god, but that god had given him that interaction and that human being. did you both serve in the peace corps? did you meet in the peace corps? did you get married before you went into the peace corps? were you serving in the same country? you were? okay good. it's romantic, right? [laughter] and you are still married, right? [laughter] maybe not. i don't know. [laughter] [applause] that's fantastic. that's unbeliev
was and that is where we spent our time and energies on. >> you do not know who changed ?t and thr >> i do not. >> i think there is some testimony with respect to that within the intel community. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i think the report, the accountability review report cluster is honest in pointing out the mistakes were made within the agency. hopefully now as the result of the report, as you all have indicated, we can move forward and hold people accountable and make the appropriate changes and follow-up on the lessons that are learned as a result of this tragedy in benghazi. i appreciate secretary clinton's taking responsibility for what happened. as she points out in her letter to this committee, going even further than the recommendations in the report to address the mistakes we made. >> i went to the letter from sector clinton to me and to senator lugar and the record at this time. >> one of the things you pointed out is that you have gone out -- there have been teams to assess the 19 state department locations around the world where there are high risk areas. i wonder if you can talk ab
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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